Special issue: Marketing Education

The Marketing Review, Volume 14, Number 1, 2014

Editorial: Special issue: Marketing education
Lynn Vos & Ross Brennan
Read more >
Vos, L. & Brennan, R. (2014). Editorial: Special issue: Marketing Education. The Marketing Review, 14(1), 1-3(3). http://dx.doi.org/10.1362/146934714X13948909473068

Helping students understand the relevance of social media tools to marketing practitioners: A case study of a marketing principles module
Lorna Walker
“This paper discusses how Kolb’s (1984) learning cycle was used as the basis of a project to better incorporate social media into a core principles of marketing module, with the aim of developing students’ appreciation of how marketing practitioners use such media. Students and tutors were encouraged to use Twitter, Pinterest, YouTube and blogging during the module and these media were built into the assessment strategy. Two iterations of changes were made over the course of a year. The results were measured quantitatively and qualitatively through the module feedback survey …” Read more >
Walker, L. (2014). Helping students understand the relevance of social media tools to marketing practitioners: A case study of a marketing principles module. The Marketing Review, 14(1), 5-27(23). http://dx.doi.org/10.1362/146934714X13948909473103

Employability skills: Maintaining relevance in marketing education
Beverly Barker
“Employability is an important outcome of education, particularly with vocationally orientated degrees such as marketing. Supporting this, a wide range of literature discusses the skills that should be developed within students in general, and those on business and marketing courses in particular (Bennett, Dunne, & Carré, 1999; Hillage & Pollard, 1998; Zinser, 2003). However, with increasing competition for graduate placements and jobs, do the skills under discussion remain relevant to the conditions of the job market and still give students an ‘edge’? …” Read more >
Barker, B. (2014) Employability skills: Maintaining relevance in marketing education. The Marketing Review, 14(1), 29-48(20). http://dx.doi.org/10.1362/146934714X13948909473149

Designing relevant marketing curriculum: The state of the nation
June Dennis
“Higher education establishments constantly review and modify courses on a periodic basis, yet, as a sector, only one in ten new courses successfully recruits students (Coyle & Roberts, 2012). As more marketing roles are taken by IT and psychology specialists rather than by marketing graduates, there has also been increased discussion relating to the relevance of skills obtained by marketing graduates and whether the marketing curriculum is appropriate for the 21st Century. The purpose of this research is to identify current practice in marketing curriculum design and to make recommendations to improve the process …” Read more >
Dennis, J. (2014). Designing relevant marketing curriculum: The state of the nation. The Marketing Review, 14(1), 49-66(18). http://dx.doi.org/10.1362/146934714X13948909473185

Marketing simulation games: A review of issues in teaching and learning
Lynn Vos
“Simulation games continue to be widely used in marketing education and are also one of the most researched pedagogical tools, with perspectives and research coming from a broad range of disciplines. Based upon a review of the simulation games literature over the past four decades and from insights gained by the author, a keen user of games, this paper investigates some of the challenges that users of simulations may face, and provides recommendations for overcoming them …” Read more >
Vos, L. (2014). Marketing simulation games: A review of issues in teaching and learning. The Marketing Review, 14(1), 67-96(30). http://dx.doi.org/10.1362/146934714X13948909473220

Reflecting on experiential learning in marketing education
Ross Brennan,
“Experiential learning methods have become increasingly popular in marketing education. Factors underlying this trend are: the desire to respond to the changing higher education environment (the student-customer); the need to endow students with employability skills; the common sense assumption that since marketing is a practical activity, learning from experience makes sense; and, pedagogic methods designed around experiential learning theory which has been widely influential in recent decades …” Read more >
Brennan, R. (2014). Reflecting on experiential learning in marketing education. The Marketing Review, 14(1), 97-108(12) http://dx.doi.org/10.1362/146934714X13948909473266